Vatican - Day Time Tour

Duration
3hours
Inclusions
Small Group, Tour Guide, Entrance Fees
Language
English
Max Group Size
20 people
$
55
49
-
$
198
20
/ Adult
Available:
Daily
Time:
10:00 AM, 12:00 PM, 2:00 PM, 1:00 PM, 10:30 AM, 2:30 PM
Efim G
Response rate: 
100%
Response time:
several hours
Highlights
  • The Vatican Museums, located in the popes’ former living and working quarters, allow you to enter in His Holiness’ kingdom, even if you aren’t wearing red shoes.
  • Sistine Chapel - You’ll gaze upon his marble models for the Sistine Chapel – the Belvedere Apollo,
Description
About your tour

“Welcome to the Vatican!”, says the Italy with Us guide, stepping inside the massive, ninth-century walls that protect the world’s smallest country. “We aren’t in Italy anymore”. No passport required, just a desire to be enthralled by art, archaeological finds and religious objects spanning two millennia.
Italy with Us’ daytime tour transports you into this artistic and spiritual paradise. The Vatican Museums, located in the popes’ former living and working quarters, allow you to enter in His Holiness’ kingdom, even if you aren’t wearing red shoes. To fully enjoy this labyrinth of interconnected rooms, a seasoned, official Vatican guide is necessary. Italy with Us’ guides are experts not only in art history but also in avoiding the crowds that justifiably flock to this bucket-list destination.

From the mosaic-covered floors that look like paintings to the painted ceilings that appear to be bas relief, the Vatican Museums are jam-packed with priceless art collected by the popes. Marvel at a rare gilded bronze statue of Hercules dating from the first century. Admire the Raphael-designed tapestries depicting Christ’s life (and some mind-blowing optical illusions). In the stately Gallery of Maps, your guide will take you on a journey through Italy. Forty glorious blue and green maps frescoed on the walls in the late 16th century astound with their beauty and seriously pre-GPS accuracy.

Just when the crowds are becoming too much, your guide will lead you into some rooms that are off-limits to the general public. The Hall of Animals offers almost a Noah’s Ark-sized collection of animals sculpted in marble, bronze and alabaster.

Just like you, Michelangelo walked these halls some 500 years ago to gain inspiration. You’ll gaze upon his marble models for the Sistine Chapel – the Belvedere Apollo, the muscular Laocoön and a stark, perfectly proportional torso, all around 2000 years old. The stunning culmination of your visit will be the Sistine Chapel.

“The truths of our faith speak to us here from all sides”, Pope John Paul II said about the chapel. Your guide will have opened your ears – and eyes – to its artistic icons. See the work of a dream team of Renaissance artists who depicted the lives of Moses and Christ on the side walls. Even more remarkable is Michelangelo’s ceiling. Tilt your head upward, just as the artist did when painting the ceiling, and you’ll be amazed by these legendary scenes from the book of Genesis, which resonate far more in person. Ponder Michelangelo’s encore, the monumental Last Judgement. Those destined for heaven and hell swirl around Christ in the moment before he declares their fate. At least you’ll have seen the paradise that is the Vatican.
 
Places Visited
Named after Pope Sixtus IV, the Sistine Chapel is perhaps the most famous chapel in the world. It is renowned both for its function as the Papal Conclave and for its incredible artwork.... more

The ceiling and western wall of the Sistine Chapel are adorned with some of the most astonishing paintings in the world created by the famous artist – Michelangelo Buonarroti.

Michelangelo was commissioned to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in 1508 and he completed his work in 1512. The middle section depicts nine stories from the Book of Genesis, including the renowned ‘Creation of Adam’ where the hand of God is seen reaching to Adam to instill him with life.

In 1535 Michelangelo was commissioned once again to paint the western wall over the altar. He completed this spectacular painting of the‘Last Judgment’ in 1541. The painting depicts the end-of-days and second coming of Christ when according to Christian faith all souls will be judged by Jesus,the Saints and God and sent to heaven or hell.

Despite being one of the most celebrated works of art in history, Michelangelo was originally hesitant to paint the ceiling of the chapel for he considered himself as more of a sculptor than a painter.

The original ‘Last Judgment’ painting included fully nude human figures, but these were later covered by another artist due to the demands of some Papal members who claimed that the nudity was obscene and improper.

The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel was painted by Michelangelo who depicted nine stories from the book of Genesis including the famous 'Creation of Adam'.

The first three stories are:
1. The Separation of Light from Darkness: Genesis 1:1-5;
2. The Creation of the sun, moon and planets: Genesis 1:11-19;
3. The Separation of Land from Sea: Genesis 1,9-10)

Following these paintings of the Sistine Chapel ceiling in the Vatican are the mid-section patintings:
1. The Creation of Adam & Eve (Genesis 1:26- 2:25), with the figures of man and woman in their nakedness.
2. The Banishment from the Garden of Eden (Genesis 3:22-24).

The last three frescoes of Michelangelo include:
1. The Sacrifice of Noah: (Genesis 8:15-20)
2. The Flood (Genesis 6:5-8,20)
3. The Drunkenness of Noah (Genesis 9:20-27)
* All these show the fall and rebirth of humanity

The ceiling and western wall of the Sistine Chapel are adorned with some of the most celebrated paintings in the world created by the famous artist – Michelangelo Buonarroti. Michelangelo was commissioned to paint the ceiling in 1508 and he completed his work in 1512.

Despite being one of the most adored works of art in history, Michelangelo was originally hesitant to paint the ceiling of the chapel for he saw himself as more of a sculptor than a painter. The original ‘Last Judgment’ painting included fully nude human figures, but these were later covered by another artist due to the demands of some Papal members who claimed that the nudity was obscene and improper.

The middle section of the ceiling depicts 9 stories fromthe Book of Genesis, including the iconic ‘Creation of Adam’ where the hand ofGod is seen reaching to Adam to give him life. In 1535 Michelangelo was commissioned once again to paint thewestern wall over the altar.

Michelangelo completed this spectacular painting of the‘Last Judgment’ in 1541. The painting depicts the end-of-days and second comingof Christ when according to Christian faith all souls will be judged by Jesus,the Saints and God and sent to heaven or hell.
Type:
Attraction, Cultural, Historic, Museum
  • The Vatican and Rome are holy cities to the Roman Catholic Christian faith.
The Vatican and Rome are holy cities to the Roman Catholic Christian faith. Rome is the seat of the Papacy since the 1st century AD and later home to the Vatican, where the Pope resided ... moresince the 14thcentury. Traditionally, the See of Rome was founded by Saint Peter who first held the position of the Pope or Bishop of Rome. According to UNESCO St. Peter's basilica in the Vatican is the largest religious building in the world. Today Rome has a Cathedral and more than 900 Churches and some of the most prominent Catholic churches can be found there as well as many important Catholic institutes. For Catholic believers, Rome is more than a tourist attraction but also a center for pilgrimage and Prayer.

The Vatican is situated in a walled enclave inside Rome. The Pope's residence is also known as the Apostolic Palace and it is located North-East of the St. Peter's basilica.. Since 1984 all of Vatican State is acknowledged as a UNESCO world heritage site. The main tourist attractions in the Vatican are: St. Peter's basilica, Vatican gardens, St. Peter's Square, and the Vatican Museums with their impressive collections of art, maps and statues. The entrance to the Basilica and Square are free of charge. Note that visitors are asked to dress appropriately when entering the church.

Since February 1929 Vatican City State is a sovereign state of the Holy See. This was established by the signing of the Lateran Treaties. The Vatican's status as a sovereign State is recognized universally.
Type:
Attraction, Cultural, Historic
  • The Sphere within a Sphere is a statue also known as "Sfera con Sfera".
The Sphere within a Sphere is a statue also known as "Sfera con Sfera". The Sphere within a sphere is located in the Vatican Museums. It is part of a series of bronze sculptures on ... morethis theme that can be found in prime locations all over the world such as: the Headquarters of the UN in New York; The Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, USA; Trinity College in Dublin; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C; the de Young Museum in San Francisco, USA ;The Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art; the Columbus Museum of Art in Columbus and the Tel Aviv University in Israel.

Arnaldo Pomodoro is an Italian sculptor. He was born in the 23rd of June 1926 in Morciano, Romagna, Italy. Currently he lives and works in Milan. His brother, Giò Pomodoro was also an Artist.

The "Sphere within a Sphere" Statue depicts a huge fractured orb. Inside the cracked orb you can see another one. Each tremendous sphere is broken, showing yet another cracking sphere. The design of the internal layers seems to imitate the gears or cogwheels of a complex machine such as a clock. It symbolizes the fragility and complexity of the world.This fascinating statue is located in the courtyard of the Pine cone outside the Vatican Museum. Pomodoro started to create these orbs in the early 1960s. 

Pomodoro is also known for designing a controversial fiberglass crucifix for the Cathedral of St. John in Copenhagen. In addition he sculpted pieces for the Amaliehaven park which was displayed on the waterfront in front of Amalienborg Palace in 1983. His piece "Forme del Mito" was displayed at Brisbane's World Expo '88 and was later bought by Brisbane City.

In 1999 he founded Fondazione Arnaldo Pomodoro in Milan as a centre to whose aim is to document and archive Pomodoro's work . The foundation opened an exhibition space in 2005, and it now displays exhibitions of renowned artists such as Jannis Kounellis, Lucio Fontana and Robert Rauschenberg. Flaminio Gualdoni is the current director of Fondazione Arnaldo Pomodoro. The Court of the Pigna constitutes the northern end of the great renaissance Belvedere Courtyard that extended from the Papal Palaces to Innocent VII's "palazzetto" and was subsequently divided into three parts with the construction of Sixtus V's Library and the Braccio Nuovo of Pius VII. The present courtyard which takes its name form the enormous bronze pine cone set into the "nicchone", is bounded on the south side by the Braccio Nuovo, on the east by the Chiaromonti Gallery, on the north by Innocent VIII's Palazzetto and on the west by the galleries of the Apostolic Library.
Type:
Attraction, Cultural
  • The Huge statue known as the Pigna (pine) or the Fontana Della Pigna depicts a giant Pine Cone
The Huge statue known as the Pigna (pine) or the Fontana Della Pigna depicts a giant Pine Cone. It is located in St. Peter's, in an area called the court of the Pigna.The Court of ... morethe Pigna is the northern part of the grand renaissance Belvedere Courtyard that stretches between the Papal Palaces to the "palazzetto" which belonged to Innocent VII's . The courtyard was segmented into three parts after the construction of Sixtus V's Library and the Braccio Nuovo of Pius VII. The present courtyard derived its name form the beautiful pine cone statue set into the "nicchone", borders on the south side with the Braccio Nuovo, and on the east it borders with the Chiaromonti Gallery. To its north you can find Innocent VIII's Palazzetto and on the west the galleries of the Apostolic Library are located.

The pine cone was cast out of bronze in the 1st or 2nd century by the sculptor Publius Cincius Salvius. He was identified as its creator because his name was written on the base of the huge pine. The Statue's height is almost 4 meters and on both sides of the pine cone there are bronze peacocks which are copies of the ones in Hadrian's tomb.

Before it was moved to its current location, known as the Court of the Pigna, the statue of the Pine was situated in the Campus Martius. This area is still known today as "Pigna" after this statue. At its previous location it was used as a fountain with the water pouring from holes pierced in the scales of the cone. At the 8th century it was transferred to the entrance hall of the medieval basilica of St. Peter. It was placed decoratively in the middle of the fountain covered by ornate baldachin. We know this because the statue was identified in Renaissance drawings of the hall. Eventually, during the construction of the current basilica, in 1608, the giant pine cone fountain was moved and situated in its current location.

This statue is a beautiful and ancient one and it's definitely worth stopping by and admiring it as it has been part of Rome's landscape for almost 2000 years!
Type:
Attraction, Historic
Rates
Per
Type
Price
Info
AdultPrivate Tour
$
198
20
2 people minimum, €50 each additional person
AdultVIP Group Tour
$
96
27
Max 13 people, Includes Basilica
StudentVIP Group Tour
$
87
21
Age < 25
ChildVIP Group Tour
$
80
41
6 < Age < 18
AdultGroup Tour
$
55
49
Average 20 people
StudentGroup Tour
$
46
43
Age < 25
ChildGroup Tour
$
39
64
6 < Age < 18
Schedule
Dates
Time
Info
Daily10:00 AMPrivate
12:00 PMPrivate
2:00 PMPrivate
12:00 PMSemi-Private
1:00 PMSemi-Private
10:30 AMGroup
12:00 PMGroup
2:30 PMGroup
Payment & Cancellation
Cancellation Policy
Standard Policy
  • Cancellations made 2 days before will be fully refunded except for a service fee of 3%.
  • Cancellations made at a later date will not be refunded.
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